psychedelic-psychiatrist:

Cambridgeshire-based artist Chris Wood's beautiful, geometric arrangements of colorful glass create

dazzling reflections and projections of light.

(via occupytime)


rufftoon:

blindsprings:

isthistakenalready:

Aoi Honoo is Too Real

Every update I’m like “I should just put a colour behind them, yeah, comics!” and then I draw a stupidly complex bg

Doing comics, drawing crowds and buildings…I understand the pain.


motdef:

i wonder how much longer i have before it’s completely impossible for me to google information pertaining to my degree

(via be-a-cute-scientist)


rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect
In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.
So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.
Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”
"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.

rebeccamartin2:

thenewenlightenmentage:

The Women Who Mapped the Universe And Still Couldn’t Get Any Respect

In 1881, Edward Charles Pickering, director of the Harvard Observatory, had a problem: the volume of data coming into his observatory was exceeding his staff’s ability to analyze it. He also had doubts about his staff’s competence–especially that of his assistant, who Pickering dubbed inefficient at cataloging. So he did what any scientist of the latter 19th century would have done: he fired his male assistant and replaced him with his maid, Williamina Fleming. Fleming proved so adept at computing and copying that she would work at Harvard for 34 years–eventually managing a large staff of assistants.

So began an era in Harvard Observatory history where women—more than 80 during Pickering’s tenure, from 1877 to his death in 1919— worked for the director, computing and cataloging data. Some of these women would produce significant work on their own; some would even earn a certain level of fame among followers of female scientists. But the majority are remembered not individually but collectively, by the moniker Pickering’s Harem.

Continue Reading

When Neil deGrasse Tyson told the accomplishments of “Pickering’s Harem” on Cosmos, he added the postscript, “I’ll bet you never heard the names of any of these women.”

"I wonder why."  Some of the best shade thrown, ever.

(via be-a-cute-scientist)


Pro-creating memer

emilywarrenart:

My section for the beautiful Yaoi Hands anthology zine. More info here

(via coconutmilkyway)


rosebudandcupcakez:

sizvideos:

Video

No. I would never use my comp sci powers for that.
No.
This is a mess.

Well I know what I’m going to do with my degree

(via yaoi-o-s)


(via occupytime)


preludetowind:

Nisshin Seifun (2010) - Commercial directed by Katsuya Kondo / TV Spot designed by Toshio Suzuki and Goro Miyazaki

(via blippo-kawaii)


atomskdluffy:

stephii-cat:

rose-domino:

"May cause sweating, peeing, and adequate hydration"

ITS A WATERBOTTLE

WANT

(via be-a-cute-scientist)